19th-c Brit Lit

Conference paper

(Digital) Byron / (Humanities) Hunt: Revisiting Byron’s Relationship with Hunt through the Use of Digital Humanities Tools

Although based in large part on works previously published, Hunt’s Autobiography is probably the most important work of his later life, and rightly deserves Thomas Carlyle’s praise as being ‘by far the best of the autobiographic kind I remember to have read in the English language’. While a large section of the material included in […] Read more

Lecture

Leigh Hunt, Rebooted: Textual Editing and Digital humanities

This talk will begin with a discussion of Leigh Hunt’s newspaper The Examiner, Hunt’s most famous publication as editor in the frst two decades of the 19th-century, and the complex politics of authorial revisions and reception history it received in Hunt’s ‘Autobiography’. It will also engage with the challenges in representing online Hunt’s complex set of relationship […] Read more

News

Appointment as co-director of NINES

NINES is excited to announce that Michael Sinatra has been named Co-Director of NINES, sharing the role with Andrew Stauffer of the University of Virginia. Launched in 2005 by Jerome McGann at the University of Virginia with the support of the Mellon Fondation, NINES is a scholarly organization devoted to forging links between the material archive of […] Read more

Events

Round-table on ‘Romanticism and Material Culture’

Organized by the section études anglaises of the Département des littératures et des langues du monde, I will be chairing a round-table on ‘Romanticism and Material Culture’ on Monday 12 December: Sophie Thomas (Ryerson University): “Re-materializing Pompeii: Print, Trace, Cast” Julia Carlson (University of Cincinnati): “Tangible Print and the Poetics of Tact: Wordsworth, Coleridge, and […] Read more

Fall 2016

Description: This course is an advanced undergraduate class devoted to British novels published between the years 1816 (year of the publication of Jane Austen’s Emma) and 1895 (year of the publication of H.G. Well’s Time Machine). Students will be introduced to an array of theoretical approaches to these texts in order to broaden their perspective on […] Read more

Fall 2012

Description: This course is an advanced undergraduate class devoted to British novels published between the years 1816 (year of the publication of Jane Austen’s Emma) and 1895 (year of the publication of H. G. Wells’ The Time Machine). Students will be introduced to an array of theoretical approaches to these texts in order to broaden their perspective […] Read more